Displaying items 31 - 45 of 93 in total
  • Archive Resource

    Legal Reform, Women's Empowerment And Social Change: The Case Of Egypt

    In the last decade, new family laws have been passed in Egypt, with important ramifications for women. In this article, I argue that two issues diminish the transformative role that these reforms could play in strengthening Egyptian women's rights and achieving gender justice. First, despite the recently passed laws, the model of marriage that the state continues to uphold through its codes and courts is premised on gendered roles and rights for husbands and wives. This model, however, contradicts the realities of Egyptian marriages. …

  • Archive Resource

    Marriage, Motherhood And Masculinity In The Global Economy: Reconfiguration Of Personal And Economic Life, IDS Working Paper 209

    The different processes associated with globalisation have led to rising rates of paid work by women often in contexts where male employment is stagnant or declining. This paper explores how women and men are dealing with this feminization of labour markets in the face of the widespread prevalence of male breadwinner ideologies and the apparent threat to male authority represented by women’s earnings. Responses have varied across the world but there appears to be a remarkable resistance to changes in the domestic division of unpaid work within the household and a continuing failure on the part of policymakers to provide support for women’s care responsibilities, despite the growing importance of their breadwinning roles. Many of the services previously provided on an unpaid basis are being transferred to the paid economy but most working women continue to bear a disproportionate burden of domestic responsibility. …

  • Archive Resource

    Media In The Eyes Of Women: New Possibilities?

    This report in Bangla focuses on research which explored how Bangladeshi women engage with television and the meanings, choices and subjectivities they derive from it. The researchers examined the changing representations of women and female sexuality and explored how women in different sites and classes engaged with television and attached meaning to the images represented on screen. …

  • Archive Resource

    Men Aboard? Movement for a Uniform Family Code in Bangladesh

    In the late 1980s and early 90s, the Bangladeshi feminists mobilised for a uniform family code. Despite the extensive groundwork by the feminists on the required legal changes, the movement failed to attain its goal. The demand for a uniform family code not only challenged male privileges based on Shari'a law but also those based on religious laws of the minority communities. This chapter explores the movement building strategies and negotiations for a uniform family code, particularly feminist efforts to contest the pitting of the ‘right to equality’ against the ‘right to religion’. …

  • Archive Resource

    Moroccan Divorce Law, Family Court Judges, and Spouses' Claims: Who Pays the Cost when a Marriage is over?

    This chapter explores the impact that legal reform has had on Moroccan divorce practice. The Mudawwanat al-Usra (Family Law Compilation) of 2004 included a new provision under which courts should grant a judicial divorce to either spouse on the grounds of marital discord (shiqāq). Since the evidential requirements for establishing the grounds of shiqāq are easily met, the numbers of judicial divorces increased exponentially during 2004-7. …

  • Archive Resource

    Nari Shastho Kormi: Shomojhota O Nobouddog

    This report in Bangla focuses on research which considers whether and how the work done by Women Health Workers leads to changes at the individual, family and societal levels. The researchers explored how Women Health Workers are introducing new role models for women, challenging purdah, encouraging mobility, and creating pathways of empowerment. …

  • Archive Resource

    Narratives of Egyptian Marriages

    Mulki Al-Sharmani critically examines the institutional narrative of marriage constructed and sustained by substantive family laws, juxtaposed against the lived experience of marriage for many women in Egypt. Based on the doctrines of classical schools of Islamic jurisprudence, Egypt’s family laws uphold a contractual model of marriage in which a husband acquires the right to a wife’s physical and sexual availability in the conjugal home in return for the obligation to provide for her and their children. …

  • Archive Resource

    O que Torna as leis de Enfrentamento da Violência Doméstica mais Eficazes?

    Domestic violence against women has gained worldwide attention as a form of discrimination as well as a violation of women’s human rights. An estimated one in three women in the world is affected, independent of their social standing and cultural background. In many countries around the world, laws are now in place making domestic violence against women a crime. Yet implementation often lags behind legal reforms. …

  • Archive Resource

    Organizing to Monitor Implementation of the Maria da Penha Law in Brazil

    The Maria da Penha Law (LMP), which was introduced in 2006, is the first Brazilian federal code to address domestic and familial violence against women. The law is the outcome of thirty years of struggles led by Brazilian women and feminist movements. LMP is an extensive legal instrument that is meant to prevent and combat domestic and familial violence against women.  …

  • Archive Resource

    Paid Work And Pathways To Women's Empowerment: Preliminary Findings From Bangladesh

    There have been a number of debates in Bangladesh, as well as elsewhere, as to whether women's experience of paid work is empowering or simply exploitative. The Bangladesh survey was designed to explore these hypotheses with a view to clarifying a) whether it was primarily the kind of work (pay, location, hours, independence of activity) which might differentiate women's experiences of paid work or whether it was the possibility for new relationships and networks that made the main difference. If the former, we would expect home based work for little pay, carried out on an irregular basis to offer least possibility of empowerment. If the latter, we would expect that it would be women's membership in different kinds of groups and associations, which might encompass home-based microfinance activities, to make the significant difference. …

  • Archive Resource

    Paid Work as Pathway of Empowerment: Pakistan's Lady Health Worker Programme

    This chapter explores the contributions that paid work can make to creating pathways of empowerment for women in Pakistan. It draws on the case of Pakistan’s government-run Lady Health Workers Programme (LHWP), which employs almost 100,000 women across Pakistan as community health workers who act as a vital link between communities and primary health care. …

  • Archive Resource

    Pathways Latin America Hub Final Synthesis Report

    Final synthesis report from the Latin American Hub of Pathways of Women’s Empowerment (Pathways) - an international research and communications programme that has focused for the five years from 2006-2011 on understanding and influencing efforts to bring about positive change in women’s lives. After an introduction to the Latin American research projects within the four research themes, the report analyses selected research. Highlights from the LA Hub are given along with a detailed list of research outputs. …

  • Archive Resource

    Performing The Nation. Cultural History Of Bengali Muslim Women: Part II (1940-1979)

    This presentation to the Pathways South Asia Hub Final Conference held in Dhaka from 26-28 July 2011 outlines Pathways South Asia research which explores Bengali women's ability to become cultural markers and their place in shaping an emerging nationalist discourse. By using a focus on music, the research looks at the binary between the secular and the religious and questions how the Bangladeshi nation can be understood through this through history. …

  • Archive Resource

    Pilot Study Report On Women's Empowerment In Sierra Leone

    This pilot study was conducted over a two-month period in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Seventeen women from different socio-economic, educational, religious, and ethnic backgrounds were interviewed and they were encouraged to talk about the following: family life while growing up, marriage, work and education, the war, religion, excision, politics, their take on empowerment and general concerns about Salone society. The report includes transcripts from some of the interviews. …

  • Archive Resource

    Policy Analysis Of Abortion In Indonesia: The Dynamic Of State Power, Human Need And Women's Right, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    The women of Indonesia with unwanted pregnancies face stark choices: giving birth and facing social ostracism, loss of family support network, and even harsh criminal punishment; or an abortion from a clandestine provider, risking serious injury or death. The complexity of Indonesian life is multifaceted. Ruled by multiple formal and traditional legal systems, it remains embroiled in an on-going struggle to establish its identity during the process of democratization and a strengthening of Islamic values in a time when the vast majority of its population, as Muslims, feel under attack by the West’s ‘war on terror’. The campaign to bring in a new health bill including the decriminalization of abortion has been challenged, facing lack of consensus that high maternal mortality rates are primarily caused by clandestine abortions, varying reasons behind reforms to the health law, and lack of political will to see through the change because of difference of opinion. …