Displaying items 16 - 30 of 53 in total
  • Archive Resource

    Review Of Strategic Approaches To Building Constituencies By Women's Organisations

    This research report describes and analyses how three national level women’s organisations in Bangladesh mobilized support around a particular issue among their membership and allies. The research uses resource mobilisation theories and feminist studies on the state and social movement for grounding this research. The focus is on the decade of 1990s and the present decade. Through these case studies the research aims to capture the diversity of the strategies used by these organisations for building constituencies internally and externally, i. …

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    Storytelling

    Ana el-Hekkeya is a group of academics, writers and artists, working on raising public awareness on gender issues. The group worked with young Arabic journalists, writers, poets and bloggers, to re-examine the gender stereotypes dominant in popular culture through a series of writing workshops. As the participants were important producers of popular culture and played a part in shaping how their readers perceived women, producing gender sensitive stories through these workshops was one of the group’s main achievements. In total, 63 gender sensitive stories were written with 12 of these stories included in a performance for the public. …

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    Terms Of Contact And Touching Change: Investigating Pleasure In An HIV Epidemic, IDS Bulletin, 37.5

    Western-led discussions of sexual health have foregrounded warnings of the dangers of sex. Yet, pleasure is one important reason why people have sex. Sexual health work must open up discussion of how pleasure can be experienced with less risk. There are challenges in addressing pleasure in work on safer sex. …

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    The Meaning Of Empowerment, Daily Star

    A short article explaining BRAC Development Institute’s research into what ‘empowerment’ means when applied to women’s position, rights and development in Bangladesh, and how BRAC is mapping out the processes that have contributed to women’s empowerment. Firdous Azim demonstrates how the research is pushing us to reexamine the word empowerment in new and challenging ways, to take it out of its more formal meanings and to look at the ways that women themselves understand the process. …

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    The New 21st Century Woman

    What is new and different in the formation of the 21st century Bangladeshi woman in comparison to her formation in the 20th century? What forces are at play in the construction of the figure of this new millennial woman? The Pathways of Women’s Empowerment research consortium has identified three themes to map out the progress and changes in women’s lives. The notion of ‘progress’ must be problematized, and a cultural trajectory must be used to see where the conflicts between tradition and modernity are still at play, what these concepts mean in the lives of women, and what are the main cultural factors that pertain to the lives of women today. In this chapter, Azim refers to three broad fields: religion, especially Islam; the role of new media; and the development discourse and analyses their role in the fashioning of the new Bangladeshi woman. …

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    The New Woman Of The Twenty-First Century In Bangladesh

    The author presents the findings of her research to look at two dominant factors – religion and popular culture – that have affected women’s lives in Bangladesh in their search to give it meaning and form. This research stemmed from an exploratory paper five years ago, and sought to answer the questions: How are we to understand these ‘new’ women? What are the policy and programmatic interventions that are now required? How are they being articulated by women themselves? In short, what’s new in new women’s lives? In this paper presented to Pathways South Asia Hub Final Conference, 26-28 July 2011, first Azim provides a background on nation- and identity-building in post-colonial South Asia and then examines the position of women a hundred years on to see if there has been a ‘resolution’ of the nation- and identity- building issues, or what shape and form they have acquired since. The research found that religion, however it figured into women’s lives, was always empowering and was not seen as anti-modern or conservative. With regard to popular culture, they found that women viewers of TV were aware of social messages on TV and were critical of TV programming’s lack of diversity. …

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    Towards Alternative Representations Of Women In African Cultural Products in Festschrift In Honour Of Ama Atta Aidoo

    Ama Ata Aidoo is an iconic African writer who has inspired generations of black and other women writers. This latest collection of short stories brings together diverse themes that speak of the relationship between Africa and its diaspora in terms of home, exile and sense of belonging and alienation. It reveals the complexities involved in the African diaspora connections, engaging with a sense of anomie and fragmentation, revealing her interest in presenting common human frailties. Steeped in Ghanaian and African history, her craftmanship also embraces pertinent new levels. …

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    Trajectories Of Desire And The Mediation Of Socio-Cultural Spaces, Final Report

    As part of the South Asia Hub of the Pathways to Women's Empowerment Research Programme, 'Changing Narratives of Sexuality: Trajectories of Desire and the Mediation of Socio-Cultural Spaces' this action research project was designed to examine discursive changes and their impact on women's lives/identities in areas related to (i) religion specifically the global upsurge of religious fundamentalisms and resurgent patriarchies with reference to the rise of Wahabi Islam as a hegemonic discourse, new religious practices and women in Pakistan and (ii) the media, predominantly satellite television, in the wider context of technologies, consumerism and globalization. The project aimed to identify and uncover new pathways and sites of change in the two areas mentioned above by using different methodological techniques. The project was expanded by the Simorgh Lahore Partnership to include traditional religious practices and rituals in the religious component so as to deepen understanding of the processes of change that are underway to see how far they are conducive to women's empowerment and to what extent they merely reformulate and reinforce existing norms regarding women's status and position in society. In the process, it examines the ways in which these factors shape women’s identities and self perception. …

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    Trajectories Of Desire And The Mediation Of Socio-Cultural Spaces: The Impact Of The Media And Religion On Women’s Lives In Bangladesh And Pakistan

    This presentation given by Neelam Hussain to the South Asia Hub Conference held from 26-28 July 2011 in Dhaka, was on research conducted by the Simorgh Women's Resource and Publication Centre, Lahore. The aim of the research on the impact of the media and women's religious gatherings on women's lives in Pakistan was to examine the impact of two seemingly disparate yet interlinked modern day phenomena, namely: the dars (women's religious gatherings) and new technologies, specifically satellite television and the mobile phone. …

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    Unmarried In Palestine: Embodiment And (Dis)Empowerment In The Lives Of Single Palestinian Women (Report)

    Using topical life stories, focus groups, data and discourse analysis, this paper, presented to 'Pathways: What are we Learning?' Analysis Conference, Cairo, 20-24 January 2009, explores the experiential diversity and thematic commonalities in the lives of Palestinian unmarried women, in the context of a society experiencing prolonged warlike conditions, political crisis, and social disruption. In particular, the project examines dynamics of choice, embodiment, responsibility, and survival, as well as attempt identify structural, social, political and economic factors shaping Palestine’s rather unique pattern of early, but not universal marriage, with a relatively high proportion of never-married women (but not men) over time. Comparing topical life stories of an earlier generation of largely educated unmarried women (now 40-65) who often had a clear trajectory of a life committed to the national project e and/or self-improvement with the diverse voices found in focus groups of contemporary young women (18-25) in diverse locations in the West Bank offers a window into how choice and responsibility operate differentially in the lives of unmarried women. Issues explored are how unmarried women place and value themselves in family and societal settings, how families and communities view unmarried women and shape these choices and responsibilities, and how unmarried women narrate marriageability, self-fashioning, and embodiment. …

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    Watching Women Watching TV: Lessons From The Field

    This is a presentation given by Samia Rahim at the Cultural Crossroads Conference held in Hong Kong on 20 June 2010 on research conducted into how women in Bangladesh interacted with television and the media. The research countered dominant discourse which devalues women's relationship with television and in using a wide range of methodologies across a range of research locations uncovered that women do not only use television to accumulate new knowledge, but also strategies, tactics and ways to handle various situations. …

  • Archive Resource

    Women And Religion In Bangladesh And Pakistan

    With growing observance of the veil, a rise in faith-based schooling, and the increasing popularity of Islamic television channels, religious activity has come to play a more and more significant part in the lives of women in South Asia. Pathways’ research sought to explore what the changes in the cultural and political landscape signal for women’s understanding of self and their ability to live “freely” in the world. Does religion become all encompassing and stifle women’s sense of self? Or do women find ways to use new idioms to feel empowered? …

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    Women Watching Television: Surfing between Fantasy and Reality

    Young women are increasingly experiencing greater visibility and mobility in Bangladeshi society. The new public spaces they occupy together with the more traditional private spaces are greatly mediated by the narratives beamed on television. This chapter looks at how Bangladeshi women engage with television and the meanings and choices they derive from it. …

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    Women Watching TV In Bangladesh

    Women have increasingly taken on new roles over the past two decades within Bangladeshi society, occupying positions not previously seen such becoming wage earners. This shift is thought to have been influenced by urban culture and popular media. This case study details research which has sought to explore how media is affecting Bangladeshi women’s lives by shaping their aspirations. …

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    Women Watching TV: New Spaces, New Choices

    Short article which illuminates one woman's demand for more empowered representations of women on Bangladeshi TV. …