Displaying items 1 - 15 of 23 in total
  • Archive Resource

    Addressing The Preconditions: Women's Rights And Development In Financing Gender Equality, Commonwealth Perspectives

    ‘Gender equality’ may have made it into the language of mainstream development. But in most parts of the world, inequalities between women and men in the workplace, in political institutions and in the home have proven exasperatingly persistent. For all the valiant efforts that have been made, gender mainstreaming has largely failed live up to its promises. The dilution and depoliticization of the ‘gender agenda’ as it has come to be taken up by development institutions calls for more attention to be paid to what it takes to make a difference to women’s lives. …

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    Conceptualising Women's Empowerment In International Development Agencies, Pathways Working Paper 6

    The Beijing Women’s Conference in 1995 marked a coming together of feminists from all over the world, with an end agreement on a transformative and relatively clear text – the Beijing Platform for Action. Over a decade later, words and agendas around women’s empowerment have changed as the wider international development agenda has moved away from the notion of people centred development of the 1990s. Eyben and Napier-Moore trace those changes and tease out the waxing and waning of different associational meanings attached to women’s empowerment as used in international development agencies. Their historical analysis suggests a current privileging of meanings of efficiency and growth, broadly crowding out meanings of empowerment associated with solidarity and collective action. …

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    Counting The Cost Of Privatised Provision: Women, Rights And The Neoliberal Health Reforms In Chile

    This paper traces the reshaping of the right to health under neoliberal reforms and considers the new Plan AUGE that has been implemented in the health sector in Chile. The paper highlights how women’s right to health has been challenged by the marketisation of health care services. At the same time the paper demonstrates how a limited notion of women’s health is being promoted, one that notably excludes women’s reproductive rights. The Plan AUGE will improve women’s access to health care services but does little to challenge the underlying gendered assumptions around unpaid work and women’s reproductive rights remain severely restricted. …

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    De que Forma os programas de Proteção Social Podem oferecer Justiça Social para as Mulheres?

    Social protection is the right to survive. It is the right to a basic income, shelter, health, food and information, all of which enables people to survive, support their dependents and find a way out of need and destitution. The right to social protection exists for all people, regardless of age, sex or ethnicity. The existence of this right should give people a sense of security even when they are not claiming it. …

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    Empowerment as Resistance: Conceptualizing Palestinian Women's Empowerment

    This chapter contextualises empowerment historically in Palestinian practices of mobilisation and resistance. The author draws on interviews and focus group discussions to explore the meanings the term has come to acquire in the Palestinian context. …

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    How Can Social Protection Provide Social Justice For Women?

    Social protection is the right to survive. It is the right to a basic income, shelter, health, food and information, all of which enables people to survive, support their dependents and find a way out of need and destitution. The right to social protection exists for all people, regardless of age, sex or ethnicity. The existence of this right should give people a sense of security even when they are not claiming it. …

  • Archive Resource

    Implementing Domestic Violence Legislation in Ghana: The Role of Institutions

    Feminist activists have looked to the law and to law reform as a key instrument for advancing women’s rights because of the broad reach of the law and its ability to produce social change, especially for less powerful and marginalised groups in society who have used legal reform to compensate for their lack of power (Lobel 2007). But as "while the formal rules can be changed overnight, the informal norms [i. e. "norms of behaviour, conventions and codes of conduct"] change only gradually. …

  • Archive Resource

    Quota Systems And Women's Political Representation, Literature Review, Annotated Bibliography And Country Statistics Tables

    An eighty-six page literature review and bibliography with study tables. The chapters in the literature review are: Types of quota; Structural factors that affect the implementation and effectiveness of quotas; Campaigns for women’s representation and influence; Challenges women representatives face in promoting their power and influence; Beyond ‘presence’: enhancing women representative’s power and influence; Questioning quotas. The annotated bibliography sections are: Conceptual Articles and Reviews; Regional comparison and analysis; Country case-studies; Useful web-pages. …

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    Readjusting Women's Too Many Rights: The State, the Public Voice, Women's Rights in South Yemen

    This chapter discusses the processes that led to the promulgation of the two Yemeni family codes of 1974 in the South and 1992 after the Unification. The author will look from a larger societal perspective at who the actors were in drafting the codes and what kind of public debates were allowed as part of the two processes. In particular, she will discuss the theoretical implications of a development gone reverse; does modernisation always bring women more rights? What kind of rhetoric a state has to turn into when it takes away women rights that gained popular approval? …

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    Reforming Egyptian Family Laws: The Debate about a New Substantive Code

    In the first decade of the new millennium, a series of new procedural personal status laws were passed in Egypt, with great significance for women. However, many of those who pushed for these reforms felt that the lack of comprehensive changes in the substantive laws undermined the new procedural laws and maintained a legal system that legitimised hierarchical gender roles and relations.  Accordingly, since 2005 there have been initiatives to introduce a new comprehensive family law.  These new efforts have triggered a heated public debate. …

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    Roundtable: Women In Politics: Women's Political Effectiveness

    The 'Women in Politics: Women's Political Effectiveness' Roundtable aimed to explore and highlight examples of support and training which are effective in promoting women's participation in politics. …

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    Social Workers As Social Protectors! Reflections From A State Funded CCT Programme In Egypt

    This paper, presented to the IDS Social Protection for Social Justice Conference, 13-15 April 2011, examines the often neglected role of agents of developing states and the service providers that deliver public goods, specifically transfers, to the poor. It focuses on the case of Egypt. The paper describes the introduction of a new conditional cash transfers programme as a tool for social protection as it is shaped by the views and experiences of the women and men who are social workers and part of a 240,000 strong workforce employed by the Ministry of Social Solidarity (and Justice as it was renamed after the 25 January Revolution). The programme was designed so as to enhance the capabilities and include the participation and creativity of the social worker. …

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    State And CSO Partnerships In Poverty Alleviation, Chapter 6 In 2008 Egypt Human Development Report

    This chapter describes the landscape of welfare provision in one small Cairo suburb and the roles and relationships that determine this landscape. The chapter focuses specifically on the Ministry of Social Solidarity as the state apparatus mandated with welfare, poverty reduction and social protection; it investigates the range of programs that are offered by the Ministry and by CSOs active in these areas. The purpose of presenting this empirical case study is to understand the dynamics of the relationship between the state and civil society so as to suggest mechanisms for coordination, mutual accountability and more effective welfare provision to better address poverty alleviation and social protection. The case study considers the ideals and norms of each player — the state and civil society — their perceived mission statements and the objectives of their programmes so as to understand the dynamics of their power interplay. …

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    Thinking With Pleasure: Danger, Sexuality And Agency

    Sexuality, especially in African female sexual discourse, is associated with danger and fear, a paradigm that is dangerous and paralysing, especially to young women coming to sexual consciousness. Bakare-Yusuf argues for the need to provide a counter-narrative that emphasises pleasure, love and desire and transcends this discourse of sexual danger. Moving beyond this discourse allows for the exploration of the complexity and richness of women’s sexuality so that women don’t fall into a sexual paralysis. In this chapter, Bakare-Yusuf argues that the realm of ecstasy, desire, intimacy, mutuality and pleasure of the female erotic universe is often a precursor to and provides a backdrop to sexual danger and domination. …

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    This Is All Koosa: Health-Seeking For Children In A Cairo Slum

    The aim of this paper, presented at Oxford's Health, Illness and Disease Conferenced held from 3-5 2009 July is to present the findings of an ongoing research project conducted in the Cairene slum of Ain Es-Sira. It examines the effects of financial capacity and conceptions of citizenship on the health-seeking behaviour of mothers for their children. Ain Es-Sira, a slum neighbourhood of approximately 6,000 inhabitants, has been selected to benefit from a pilot study of a conditional cash transfer (CCT) programme. Implemented in dozens of countries across the world, CCT programmes give families living below the poverty line cash and, in exchange, require that families fulfill certain conditions, which are assumed to facilitate the breakdown of the intergenerational transfer of poverty. …