Displaying items 31 - 45 of 103 in total
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    Guide To Heteronormativity

    Activists, academics and practitioners Kate Bedford, Stevi Jackson, Kamala Kempadoo, Jo Doezema, Jennifer Radloff and Jeanne Prinsloo, Chris Dolan, Amy Lind, and Alan Greig define ‘heteronormativity’ in a series of short interviews. …

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    Heteronormativity And HIV In Sub-Saharan Africa, Development, 52.1

    Heteronormativity is a term yet to be widely linked to HIV and AIDS work in Sub-Saharan Africa. Andy Seale argues that a greater appreciation of heteronormativity offers an opportunity to identify effective strategies to address harmful social norms that drive HIV infection and build synergies between work currently focused exclusively on women and girls, gender and men who have sex with men. A focus on heteronormativity in HIV work can act as a catalyst to the coalition-building needed for accelerated HIV prevention activism in Africa. …

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    Highlighting Human Rights Violations: The Mock Tribunal On Abortion Rights In Kenya, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    Fewer than 40 per cent of Kenyan women use some sort of contraception, leading to unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. Nearly 50 per cent of maternal deaths are linked with unsafe abortions and national law still criminalizes those involved in the provision of an abortion, holding a possible penalty of 15 years imprisonment if found guilty. In its mandate to promote sexual and reproductive rights, including safe abortion services, the Reproductive Health and Rights Alliance of Kenya planned a Mock Tribunal with the view of informing and engaging citizens, the media, policy-makers and advocates publicly on the negative consequences of the criminalization of abortion in Kenya. Over 400 participants gathered to hear testimonies from four women who had abortions, health professionals and counsellors. …

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    How The Development Industry Imagines Sex Work, Development, 52.1

    Meena Seshu and Nandinee Bandhopadhyay who work with sex workers speak with Cheryl Overs, a sex rights activist, at an open floor session during the IDS conference on Sexuality and the Development Industry. …

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    Interrogating Norms: Feminists Theorizing Sexuality, Gender And Heterosexuality, Development, 52.1

    Charmaine Pereira looks at changing debates on gender and sexuality. She highlights feminist theorizing that in order to understand the complexity of heteronormative social relations, it is important to examine the relations among gender and sexuality in general, and heterosexuality in particular. …

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    Introduction: Putting Unsafe Abortion On The Development Agenda, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    This introductory article argues that the interlinked issues of legal reform, the provision of accessible and affordable services and the strengthening of women’s capacities to exercise agency over their own bodies make safe abortion a development issue. Within this understanding, it reviews these intersections through the multiple framings used in the articles in this IDS Bulletin. Public health arguments for safe abortion services speak to increasing concerns over the toll of maternal morbidity and mortality from unsafe abortion. Rights-based approaches engage with both national struggles for citizenship rights and personal entitlements to agency. …

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    Introduction: Sexuality Matters, IDS Bulletin, 37.5

    This IDS Bulletin addresses a theme that mainstream development has persistently neglected: sexuality. Why is sexuality a development concern? Because sexuality matters to people, and is an important part of most people’s lives. Because development policies and practices are already having a significant – and often negative – impact on sexuality, and because sexuality and the societal norms that seek to contain and control it have, in turn, a significant impact on poverty and well-being. Development needs to move beyond the current limited and negative approaches, to embrace the significance of sexuality for development in more affirmative ways. …

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    Introduction: Women, Sexuality And The Political Power of Pleasure

    This introduction introduces the debates on sexuality in the global north, and focuses on the debates around sexuality and pleasure occurring in the south that are starting to break the silence on the positive and empowering dimensions of women’s sexuality. Although there is much debate on the theoretical aspects of women’s sexuality, there is little debate on the policy implications of these debates, or documentation of practical initiatives on empowerment through positive approaches to sexuality. The authors note that, in discussions of sexuality, there is no focus on enjoyment, only on the dangerous aspects of sexuality. Development discourse associates sex with hazard and harm, and ndoes not talk about what might be positive, pleasurable or empowering about sexuality. …

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    Islam And Abortion: The Diversity Of Discourses And Practices, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    One in four world citizens across the globe identify themselves as Muslim, and they represent a striking diversity of values and interpretations of Islam’s tenets towards female sexual behaviour and abortion. This is characterized both in the social stigma associated with abortion, and the varying legal status abortion holds in Islamic countries, ranging from legalization to decriminalization in certain cases to full criminalization. In many places, the changing face of society and attitudes towards family size have not kept current with policies and access to contraception, resulting in an increase in the number of abortions and high levels of maternal mortality rates where abortion remains a criminal offense. This article illustrates how a range of strategies including documenting and sharing women’s experiences, advances in abortion techniques, and learning from model countries can be used by a variety of actors and organisations to advocate, on religious, human rights and political grounds, to gain greater access to safer abortion and sexual health services. …

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    Latin America Hub Scoping Workshop Report

    The Regional Scoping Workshop for Latin America, organized by NEIM, took place in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil, from 6-9 June 2006. The workshop was organized around five round-tables followed by open debates in plenary: 1) Theoretical Reflections on the Empowerment of Women in Latin America; 2) Power, Institutionality and the Empowerment of Women in Latin America; 3) Policies of Employment and Income as Spaces of Empowerment of Women in Latin America; 4) Public Policies for Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women; and 5) Struggles for Sexual and Reproductive Rights in Latin America. On the last two days there were three different discussion sessions in small groups, organized around the three axes that the RPC will be investigating (voice, work, and bodily integrity): 1) Issues in Measurement of Women’s Empowerment; 2) Identifying Stories of Change; 3) Exploring Policy Experiences. Group discussions had the objective of generating ideas and recommendations for the formulation of RPC projects, the results being presented in the final plenary session, followed by an informal evaluation of the workshop and its accomplishments. …

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    Laughter, The Subversive Body Organ

    Ana Francis Mor describes how laughter, brought on by cabaret theatre in health workshops in Mexico, was key to changing people, not just their minds, but their hearts and their bodies and what they do with them. Mor describes how women learn gender ideologies from the television soap operas, all-pervasive in Mexico, which take their cue from Catholicism. Mor describes trainings on health run in rural Mexico for women, men and children. The three year programme trained over 30,000 people in total, in four day-long trainings that included participants first identifying key health issues in small groups, and a cabaret theatre working on these issues in the afternoon, and performing them in the evening. …

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    Man Hunt Intimacy: Man Clean Bathroom: Women, Sexual Pleasure, Gender Violence And HIV, IDS Bulletin, 37.5

    The spread of HIV is affected by a wide range of factors including household income, domestic divisions of labour, seasonal workloads and expenditure, communication, relationships, gender violence, and sexual pleasure or dissatisfaction. Drawing on material from North and South America and Africa, the author concludes that the links between these issues are both universally experienced and critical to HIV prevention and mitigation. The author also challenges the rejection of ‘anecdote’ in formal research settings, particularly when the stories told by women – and men – are so similar and so widespread. The Stepping Stones training methodology supports participants’ own analyses of these links in their lives, and has enabled them to work out their own mutually agreeable solutions. …

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    Monster, Womb, MSM: The Work Of Sex In International Development, Development, 52.1

    Andil Gosine asks whether sex and sexuality have been left unconsidered in international development or not. Sex and sexuality he argues have always been at the heart of development. Three figures have haunted the project of international development: Monster, Womb, MSM (‘Men who have sex with Men’). Anxieties about the sexual proclivities of these figures have driven and shaped the project of international development, both as a teleological metanarrative and in its material application. …

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    My Fake Wedding: Stirring Up The Tongzhi Movement In China, Development, 52.1

    Xiaopei He describes her activities in China working with the lesbian and gay (tongzhi) movement as activists challenge the conventions and traditions of heteronormativity in innovative and fun ways. …

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    Pleasure And Empowerment: Connections And Disconnections

    Susie Jolly asks if we can reclaim sexual pleasure from the grip of the market and influence the terms on which the market engages with pleasure. She proposes a political perspective on sexuality which challenges the structures and ideologies that generate guilt and shame and make pleasure more accessible to some groups than others. …