Displaying items 16 - 30 of 82 in total
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    Family Courts In Egypt

    In the last decade a series of reforms have been introduced in Egyptian family laws. On January 26, 2000 the Egyptian Parliament passed procedural Law No. 1 of 2000. The goal of this law was to address the problems of backlog of cases and inefficient legal procedures, challenges which were mostly confronted by women since they tended to be the majority of claimants in family law cases. …

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    Family Law Reforms and Women's Empowerment: Family Courts in Egypt

    In the last decade, there have been several significant family law reforms in Egypt that have impacted the struggle to enhance the legal rights of women in the domain of marriage and family. How have these reforms been brought about? Who were the actors involved in the process? Who are the various interlocutors in the public debate about these reforms? What does this debate tell us about their views and agendas in regard to women’s rights and position in the society? This paper will answer these questions with the aim of providing the context for a study on family courts in Egypt. The purpose of this study is to examine how these reforms are being implemented, to identify the diversions and subversions in the process, and to determine whether these reforms are strengthening the legal rights of women in family disputes. The first section of the paper outlines how Shari'a model of marriage is framed in family law, and the significance of the varied ways in which this religious legal model has been interpreted and implemented. …

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    Feminist Activism, Women's Rights, and Legal Reform

    This ground-breaking collection investigates the relationship between feminist activism and legal reform as a pathway to gender justice and social change. …

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    From Constitutional Court Success To Reality: Issues And Challenges In The Implementation Of The New Abortion Law In Colombia, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    In Colombia on 10 May 2006, a Constitutional Court decision decreed that abortion is a constitutional right for women and should not be considered a crime in particular circumstances. In order to monitor the acceptance and take-up of this new decision, Women’s Link started a mapping exercise to identify obstacles and resources to work facing the proper implementation of the law. Many challenges were found, including: lack of information, confusion around conflicting laws, legal and moral conflicts among service providers leading to subjective decisions and lack of service provision, and the challenges of abiding by lawful requirements for access to services during armed conflict. Mapping and recording continues and women’s organisations continue the struggle to realize women’s sexual health rights through ensuring the judicial and disciplinary accountability of service providers and ensurers. …

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    From Status to Rights: The Shifting Dimensions of Women's Activism in Iranian Family Law Reform

    This chapter will examine the contemporary legal, social and religious (jurisprudential) debates over the recent revisions to Iran's Family Protection Act (2011). By highlighting the differential tenor of these debates in various sectors of Iranian society, this chapter will reveal the tensions over women's status and rights in Iranian society, the role of law in shaping that status from 'above,' and, finally, the disparate groups claiming the authority to define women's roles in the Iranian social order. …

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    Highlighting Human Rights Violations: The Mock Tribunal On Abortion Rights In Kenya, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    Fewer than 40 per cent of Kenyan women use some sort of contraception, leading to unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions. Nearly 50 per cent of maternal deaths are linked with unsafe abortions and national law still criminalizes those involved in the provision of an abortion, holding a possible penalty of 15 years imprisonment if found guilty. In its mandate to promote sexual and reproductive rights, including safe abortion services, the Reproductive Health and Rights Alliance of Kenya planned a Mock Tribunal with the view of informing and engaging citizens, the media, policy-makers and advocates publicly on the negative consequences of the criminalization of abortion in Kenya. Over 400 participants gathered to hear testimonies from four women who had abortions, health professionals and counsellors. …

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    How Was It For You? Pleasure And Performance In Sex Work

    This chapter challenges the assumption that sex workers get no pleasure from their work, citing research in several locations including India, China, Spain and Finland. This research demonstrates that placing sex workers’ experience of pleasure at the forefront can provide a fresh angle on familiar arguments. This is particularly important in the study of sex work, where ideological conflict and political necessity have tended to harden into fixed positions and inflexible ways of thinking. This chapter follows the lead provided by sex workers themselves in taking pleasure seriously. …

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    Implementing Domestic Violence Legislation in Ghana: The Role of Institutions

    Feminist activists have looked to the law and to law reform as a key instrument for advancing women’s rights because of the broad reach of the law and its ability to produce social change, especially for less powerful and marginalised groups in society who have used legal reform to compensate for their lack of power (Lobel 2007). But as "while the formal rules can be changed overnight, the informal norms [i. e. "norms of behaviour, conventions and codes of conduct"] change only gradually. …

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    Introduction: Legal Reform and Feminist Activism

    This introduction outlines the central themes that are covered in the chapters and sheds light on the linkages between these issues as well as drawing out the conclusions that tie the arguments of the individual chapters. Three central themes connect the chapters in this volume. The first is concerned with problematising binaries and uniform categories. That is, many of the chapters address the question: What is concealed when both reform efforts (and the public debates about them) fail to escape conceptualisations and categorisations that are based on binaries and uniform understandings of terms such as ‘religious’  ‘secular’ or ‘tradition’ and ‘modernity?’ …

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    Introduction: Putting Unsafe Abortion On The Development Agenda, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    This introductory article argues that the interlinked issues of legal reform, the provision of accessible and affordable services and the strengthening of women’s capacities to exercise agency over their own bodies make safe abortion a development issue. Within this understanding, it reviews these intersections through the multiple framings used in the articles in this IDS Bulletin. Public health arguments for safe abortion services speak to increasing concerns over the toll of maternal morbidity and mortality from unsafe abortion. Rights-based approaches engage with both national struggles for citizenship rights and personal entitlements to agency. …

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    Islam And Abortion: The Diversity Of Discourses And Practices, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    One in four world citizens across the globe identify themselves as Muslim, and they represent a striking diversity of values and interpretations of Islam’s tenets towards female sexual behaviour and abortion. This is characterized both in the social stigma associated with abortion, and the varying legal status abortion holds in Islamic countries, ranging from legalization to decriminalization in certain cases to full criminalization. In many places, the changing face of society and attitudes towards family size have not kept current with policies and access to contraception, resulting in an increase in the number of abortions and high levels of maternal mortality rates where abortion remains a criminal offense. This article illustrates how a range of strategies including documenting and sharing women’s experiences, advances in abortion techniques, and learning from model countries can be used by a variety of actors and organisations to advocate, on religious, human rights and political grounds, to gain greater access to safer abortion and sexual health services. …

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    'Khul'

    The film, which examines how the ancient Egyptian divorce law of khul’ is helping women in modern day Cairo to escape from abusive marriages, is directed by Lucy Bennett from Manifest Films. Forty-seven per cent of married women in Egypt are affected by domestic violence but whilst khul’ is a crucial law, it can come at a high price. Following the stories of three women, the film explores how khul’ has both helped and hindered them and asks what more now needs to be done. …

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    Legal Reform, Women's Empowerment and Social Change: The Case of Egypt

    New family laws have been passed in Egypt within the last several years, with important ramifications for women. In this chapter, Mulki Al-Sharmani argues that two issues diminish the transformative role that these reforms could play in strengthening Egyptian women's rights and achieving gender justice. …

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    Legal Reform, Women's Empowerment And Social Change: The Case Of Egypt

    In the last decade, new family laws have been passed in Egypt, with important ramifications for women. In this article, I argue that two issues diminish the transformative role that these reforms could play in strengthening Egyptian women's rights and achieving gender justice. First, despite the recently passed laws, the model of marriage that the state continues to uphold through its codes and courts is premised on gendered roles and rights for husbands and wives. This model, however, contradicts the realities of Egyptian marriages. …

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    Men Aboard? Movement for a Uniform Family Code in Bangladesh

    In the late 1980s and early 90s, the Bangladeshi feminists mobilised for a uniform family code. Despite the extensive groundwork by the feminists on the required legal changes, the movement failed to attain its goal. The demand for a uniform family code not only challenged male privileges based on Shari'a law but also those based on religious laws of the minority communities. This chapter explores the movement building strategies and negotiations for a uniform family code, particularly feminist efforts to contest the pitting of the ‘right to equality’ against the ‘right to religion’. …