Displaying items 1 - 15 of 198 in total
  • Archive Resource

    3G: Three Generations of Women

    3G Three Generations of Women, is an interactive multimedia project that attempts to move beyond the media stereotypes and statistics about women, and look at their real lives. The makers photograph and interview three different generations of women within one family about aspects of their experience, growing up, learning, happiness, love, and more. The aim is that this will give people some sense of the changes that have happened in the lives of these women over the past few decades. …

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    Abortion And Human Rights: Examples From Latin America, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    Human Rights Watch’s experience, in particular in Latin America, has reaffirmed that women’s ability to decide if, when, how often, and with whom to have children is fundamental to their ability to make independent decisions about work, education and family life. Restrictions imposed on access to safe and legal abortion, in addition to other sexual and reproductive health services, violate women’s rights to health, to non-discrimination and equal treatment, to privacy, to be free of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment, and the right to the benefits of scientific progress, among others. This article draws links between abortion and human rights while illustrating the scope for advocacy in the varying abortion contexts in Mexico, Nicaragua and Peru. The authors explore entry points for activism and change as they highlight regional commonalities and contextual differences with respect to abortion. …

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    Advocating For Abortion Access: Lessons And Challenges, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    This article reflects on the lessons learnt about strategies for increasing access to abortion from an 11 country comparative policy analysis known as the Johannesburg Initiative. It reflects on the value of learning and sharing strategic thinking while remembering that opportunities for litigation, policy change, shifts in programming, or even changing public opinion are often place and time specific, so that what leads to victory in one place cannot necessarily be repeated in another. The task is to build the evidence, the legal and health system capacity, the engagement with the public and policymakers to be able to take advantage of windows of opportunity as they arise. The article also suggests that while many gains have been made in winning a broader base of support for the idea of sexual and reproductive rights internationally, there is an urgent need to reinvigorate this movement, particularly through greater leadership, organisational and strategic engagement by activists from developing countries. …

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    Ageing Women and the Culture of Eternal Youth: Personal and Theoretical Reflections from a Feminist over Sixty in Brazil

    Cecilia Sardenberg’s chapter is an essay on the control over the body that a culture of eternal youth imposes on aging white, middle class women in Brazil. Sardenberg draws attention to the ideals of femininity inherent in media representations, the products, services and body technologies geared towards women’s beautification and the fight against aging. …

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    Ageing Women And The Culture Of Eternal Youth: Some Personal And Theoretical Reflections From A Feminist Over Fifty In Brazil

    In this paper presented to the Sexuality and Development Workshop, Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, 3-5 April, Sardenberg proposes to reflect upon some of the dilemmas faced by women over fifty living in the “culture of eternal youth” which, nowadays, rules Brazilian society. She recognises that the battle against age is one that cannot be won, and therefore proposes a new discourse - a feminist discourse on the female body in the process of aging. She shares some reflections, based on her own person experience, around the control over the body that the culture of eternal youth imposes on us and looks at these issues from a feminist perspective, reflecting upon how gender, age and generation, along with race and class, structure the construction of body and self. She focuses here primarily on how narratives of decline and the positive ageism of the cosmetics industry at large speak to aging white, middle-class women. …

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    An Unholy Trinity: The Church, The State, The Banks And The Challenges For Women Mobilising For Change In Nicaragua

    The paper explores the increasing inter-connectivity of the economic and religious ‘right’ through consideration of recent events in Nicaragua. It examines the policy discourse of the state and the international development banks though consideration of a Conditional Cash Transfer programme and highlights how this draws on notions of family and family values, notions more generally promoted by the Church. It suggests that those that seek to resist the actions of these three actors face a difficult challenge, not least since their own counter-actions continue to be largely un-connected. The discussion highlights how on the one hand women’s movements have tended to focus on the threats to sexual and reproductive rights from neo-conservative forces, while on the other, those that work with women’s groups at the community level have tended to respond to the real economic need of the women that result from neo-liberal policies. …

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    Approaches To Sexuality In A Multilateral Fund In Nicaragua, Development, 52.1

    Camilo Antillón Najlis identifies the interests and priorities of different actors in the development industry in Nicaragua regarding sexuality issues, through the analysis of documents produced by FED and civil society organisations (FED's framework document and 122 project proposals) in the context of two of the project selection processes one in 2006 and the other in 2007. …

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    A Quiet Revolution

    This 6 minute film explores the story behind the innovative Chapeu de Palha Mulher programme in Pernambuco, Brazil. The programme run by the Women's Secretariat helps to empower female sugar cane plantation workers.  …

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    A Rights-Based Model: Perspectives From Health Service Providers, IDS Bulletin, 39.3

    Latin America and the Caribbean have among the highest levels of unsafe abortions, and current debate rages to change the abortion-related laws and policies. In response, the International Planned Parenthood Federation – Western Hemisphere Region has established a three-pronged framework to fight unsafe abortions, based on promoting the right to increasing access and reducing need, promoted through a range of service and advocacy components. In this case study, a Uruguayan partner organization, ‘Iniciativas Sanitarias’ (IS), adapts this rights-based framework for local application, creating the harm reduction approach. Based on the rights to information, health and women’s autonomy, the IS seeks to empower women and strengthen the commitment of health professionals to provide safer abortion information and services based on the bioethical principles of autonomy, justice and patient-provider confidentiality. …

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    As Elizas Do Brasil E Suas Mortes Anunciadas

    This article by Cecilia Sardenberg focuses on the case of Eliza Samudio who was brutally murdered and it is believed her body was dismembered, although it has never been found. The perpetrator of the crime is believed to have been a famous footballer. This was a particularly shocking crime, but what is also shocking is the numerous other women who have also suffered this level of brutality but whose stories don't reach the press because their cases don't have the same high profile nature which the famous footballer provided. Cecilia discusses how this case demonstrates how violence against women in Brazil is still sadly trivialised. …

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    A Vida Politica - Christina

    Christina is a member of the feminist theatre group Loucas de Pedra Lil s, who have been performing together for twenty years. The film follows Christina as she and the other Loucas perform a piece of street theatre on the march that takes place in Brazil's largest city, Sao Paulo, on 28 September every year to commemorate the Latin American and Caribbean Day for the Decrminalisation of Abortion. Across the continent, abortion has become a huge political issue; in Brazil, the struggle has intensified as the traditional opponent of women's reproductive rights, the Catholic Church, has become ever more persistent and unscrupulous in its tactics. Using street theatre and skits at public events and in public spaces, the Loucas campaign on issues of sexual and reproductive health and rights, combining playful humour with powerful commentaries drawing attention to the deadly seriousness of the issues at stake. …

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    A Vida Politica - Creuza Oliveira

    Creuza is a former domestic worker and president of the National Federation of Domestic Workers. Put into domestic service without pay at the age of 10, Creuza received her first salary at 15 and suffered years of abusive treatment in the houses of her employers. According to the last census, Brazil has 8 million domestic workers, the majority of whom are black. Creuza has always felt it was wrong that domestic workers did not have the same rights as other workers. …

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    A Vida Politica - Jane - Daspu

    Jane is a model for the fashion label 'Daspu' (das = 'of'', pu - from puta = 'whores'), created by the NGO Davida, whose mission is to end discrimination against sex workers and secure their status as legitimate workers. She is a sex worker and a mother of three children, and she is openly HIV positive. The film follows her on a fashion shoot by one of Brazil's most prestigious fashion photographers. Sex work is not illegal in Brazil, but sex workers suffer stigma and discrimination. …

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    A Vida Politica - Negra Jho

    For Negra Jho, a hairdresser whose salon lies in the heart of the old centre of the city of Salvador - where more than 80% of the population are black - beauty is politics. In a context in which centuries of racism have shaped ideas of beauty, the politics of our hair gains new significance. Brazilian society has privileged images of white women as icons of beauty. Black women have grown up being told that their hair is ugly, and that beautiful hair is straight and smooth. …

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    Beyond NGOization?: Reflections From Latin America, Development 52.2

    Sonia Alvarez reconsiders what she had earlier labelled ‘the Latin American feminist NGO boom’ of the 1990s. She offers reflections on how and why, at least in that region of the world, we may be moving beyond it. Alvarez revisits the notion of NGO-ization, then reviews the crucial ‘movement work’ performed by NGOs that was often obscured by that notion. She proposes that Latin American feminisms and other social movements may be moving away from the particular organizational forms and practices – actively promoted and officially sanctioned by national and global neo-liberalism – that characterized NGO-ization in the past. …