Displaying items 166 - 180 of 277 in total
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    Small Powers, Little Choice: Contextualising Reproductive And Sexual Rights In Slums In Bangladesh, IDS Bulletin, 37.5

    How do young married women fare in an urban slum in Bangladesh? This article is based on in-depth ethnographic fieldwork among 153 married adolescent girls, aged 15–19, in a Dhaka slum, carried out from December 2001–January 2003. The author finds a shift away from the traditional arranged marriage practices, with 81 out of 153 young women having “love” marriages. Young women now have greater mobility and freedom to choose their own partners, but at the same time, face greater instability in marital relations. The lived experiences of engaging in sexual relations with their spouses are fraught with contradictions. …

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    Sodomy In India: Sex Crime Or Human Right?, IDS Bulletin, 37.5

    There is a wide spectrum of sexual acts, practices and identities worldwide. The existing language of sexual rights has emerged largely in relation to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. In turn, this language seems to cater primarily to LGBT or similar such identities. Heterosexuals may be excluded, as well as indigenous same sex practising or transgender people who do not identify as LGB or T, such as the Hijras of South Asia. …

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    Something Is Better Than Nothing? Political Party Discourses On Women's Empowerment In Bangladesh

    The objective of this paper presented to the 'Pathways: What are we Learning?' Conference held in Cairo from 20-24 January 2009, is to analyse the discourses on women’s empowerment among the three main political parties in Bangladesh: the Awami League (AL); Bangladesh Nationalist party (BNP), and Jamaat-E-Islami. The analysis of these documents focuses on the following areas: a) what issues and ideas have the political parties incorporated from the feminist and development discourses on women’s empowerment; b) where do the dissonances lie in this incorporation process; and c) where do the centrist and religion based parties vary on their discourse on women’s empowerment. The paper argues that of these parties have drawn from the national and international development discourse on women’s empowerment and on certain issues ideas propagated by the Bangladeshi feminists. However, compared to the two centrist parties AL and BNP, the Islamist party, Jamaat adopted a more comprehensive view of women’s empowerment. …

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    "Something Is Better Than Nothing?" Political Party Discourses On Women's Empowerment In Bangladesh. South Asian Journal 24

    The paper analyses the discourses on women’s empowerment among the three main political parties in Bangladesh: the Awami League (AL), Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) and Jamaat ‐e‐ Islami. It argues that the Islamist party, Jamaat, has taken a more comprehensive view of women’s empowerment compared to the centrist parties, AL and BNP, who have an instrumentalist approach to women’s empowerment. This divergence is partly a result of the need for Jamaat to ideologically convince supporters that they have been able to deal with the challenge raised by women’s movement successfully. The centrist parties are able to disregard this pressure, and are perhaps reluctant to antagonize potential voters by appearing too ‘un‐Islamic. …

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    South Asia Hub Scoping Workshop Report

    This report contextualizes women’s empowerment in South Asia and conceptualizes women’s empowerment. The rest of the report draws on information from the ten scoping papers prepared in three countries (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh), on the presentations and discussions that took place at the regional scoping workshop held in Dhaka from 19-21 August 2006, and the first Advisory Committee meeting and on a number of other papers drawn to address gaps in the material covered. All the scoping papers addressed to a greater or lesser extent some of the important commonalities and differences in the gendered structures of constraint in the region as perceived through the lens of their particular theme. Cross-cutting themes were body, paid work and voice. …

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    Speaking For Change: Voice And Women's Empowerment

    The realities of women’s lives in Pakistan are complex and challenging. The first section of this detailed scoping paper which was presented at the Pathways South Asia Hub Scoping Workshop 19-21 August 2006, presents an overview of current day discrimination that Pakistani women and girls face, including reduced access to resources, and discriminatory legal and customary practices. To understand women’s voice, this paper uses the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework. The second section describes initiatives that have helped expand women’s political space in Pakistan. …

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    Stories From The Hill Tracts (The Daily Star)

    Samia Rahim recounts the Digital Storytelling workshop held in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh, from the process of making the stories and the major themes that emerged, to the emotional viewing at the end of all the Digital Stories made by the participants. …

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    Stories Of Change

    Stories of Change is a film by Kamar Ahmad Simon and Sara Afreen about five women aged between 16 to 60 years old, coming from different regions and religions within Bangladesh, different yet common in sharing their dreams. …

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    Struggling For Survival And Autonomy; Impact Of NGO-isation On Women's Organisations In Bangladesh. Development 52:2

    Sohela Nazneen and Maheen Sultan analyse the impact of the NGO-ization process on the structure, autonomy and accountability relations of different types of women’s organisations in Bangladesh. They argue that the impact of NGO-ization varies depending on the resources, level of operation and the organizational motives behind adopting the NGO model. The impacts on smaller women’s organisations operating at the local level are an expansion of structure, loss of autonomy and a prioritization of accountability towards donors. However, some national-level women’s organisations have been able to manage the process through strategically mobilizing resources and prioritizing own agendas, thus retaining their feminist character. …

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    Taking The Bull By The Horns: Contemporary Feminist Politics In Bangladesh In South Asian Feminisms: Politics And Possibilities. Zed Books

    In recent years, feminists in Bangladesh have faced many challenges. This chapter focuses on two major issues: the NGO-ization of feminist organisations and the generational divide within the movement; and provides new insights on the impact of NGO-ization and the possibilities of creating an intergenerational movement. Based on empirical data, we demonstrate that size, location and available resources make a difference to the impact of NGO-ization on feminist organisations, especially on their organisational autonomy, agency and accountability. We argue that while NGO-ization has diluted feminist political messages it has increased outreach and helped to transmit feminist messages into other spheres. …

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    Terms Of Contact And Touching Change: Investigating Pleasure In An HIV Epidemic, IDS Bulletin, 37.5

    Western-led discussions of sexual health have foregrounded warnings of the dangers of sex. Yet, pleasure is one important reason why people have sex. Sexual health work must open up discussion of how pleasure can be experienced with less risk. There are challenges in addressing pleasure in work on safer sex. …

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    The Challenge Of Organizing Domestic Workers In Bangalore: Caste, Gender And Employer-Employee Relations In The Informal Economy

    Organizing domestic workers has been tried in many ways, in large part because there is so much heterogeneity within the sector. It is a sector where employer-employee relationships are very dynamic, flexible and arbitrary; domestic workers are often hard to reach, spending most of their time in the ‘private’ sphere of the home; and in some contexts, the non-monetary aspects of agreements between employers and workers may have particular significance. These are some of the many challenges to organizing. This chapter discusses the situation of domestic workers in Bangalore and the experience of Stree Jagruti Samiti, a women’s organization inspired by the women’s movement of the 1970s, in initiating and building the Karnataka Domestic Workers’ Union (KDWU), including the many challenges it has faced. …

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    The Ethics Of Empowerment

    In this article, Koggel reflects on the various influences on her thinking on gender and development, including a research project in Indonesia to explore the possible gaps between the World Bank’s understanding of empowerment and social science theory and NGO practice prior to mainstreaming the concept; capabilities theory and the difference between empowerment and agency; and the rhetoric of empowerment. She discusses the importance of contextual analyses and of the limitations of generalized policies or principles designed to promote ‘development’ or empower women. An important lesson for development ethicists is the need to pay attention to and analyse relations of power – including the overarching factor of economic globalization in the form of neo-liberal and capitalist assumptions and structures. Another important lesson is the one she learned from Sen's complex analysis of poverty: that ethical issues of development are as relevant to ‘developed’ countries as they are to poor ‘developing’ countries. …

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    The Meaning Of Empowerment, Daily Star

    A short article explaining BRAC Development Institute’s research into what ‘empowerment’ means when applied to women’s position, rights and development in Bangladesh, and how BRAC is mapping out the processes that have contributed to women’s empowerment. Firdous Azim demonstrates how the research is pushing us to reexamine the word empowerment in new and challenging ways, to take it out of its more formal meanings and to look at the ways that women themselves understand the process. …

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    The New 21st Century Woman

    What is new and different in the formation of the 21st century Bangladeshi woman in comparison to her formation in the 20th century? What forces are at play in the construction of the figure of this new millennial woman? The Pathways of Women’s Empowerment research consortium has identified three themes to map out the progress and changes in women’s lives. The notion of ‘progress’ must be problematized, and a cultural trajectory must be used to see where the conflicts between tradition and modernity are still at play, what these concepts mean in the lives of women, and what are the main cultural factors that pertain to the lives of women today. In this chapter, Azim refers to three broad fields: religion, especially Islam; the role of new media; and the development discourse and analyses their role in the fashioning of the new Bangladeshi woman. …